SeeingArtSanAntonio contempory art studio and gallery tours in San Antonio, Texas


February Artists 2008

Ben Mata

My works explore complex relationships between painting and sculptural elements; bringing non-objective two dimensional space and three dimensional objective forms to exist in a unified work of art.

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"untitled blue" by Ben Mata oil on aluminum
"untitled orange" by Ben Mata oil on aluminum
 
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Louis Vega Treviño

Louis Vega Treviños painting is something of a paradox: balancing cool analysis with a hot pursuit of color relationships in which he blurs the distinction between color, line and form such that those elements seem to merge and deconstruct in an astonishing blend of earthy umbers, ochres and sienna’s deployed against jewel-like hues that are only primary in relation to one another. Treviño’s daring approach to color relations breaks new ground in the history of colorists, a tradition in which he is rapidly establishing a secure and intriguing position.

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16 - oil on canvas, 36" x 46"
17 - oil on canvas, 24" x 48"
18 - oil on canvas, 36" x 36" x 36"
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Behind the Latin American scene with Director
of the San Antonio Museum of Art, Marion Oettinger, Jr., PhD
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Self Portrait
Jose Maria Vasquez, Mexican, 1770 - 1825
c.1800
Oil on canvas laid on board
16 7/8 x 12 3/4 inches
Purchased with funds provided by the Latin American Acquisitions Fund

 
Archangel Michael (El Arcangel Miguel)
Attributed to Juan Correa, 1645 - 1716
late 17th century
oil on canvas
San Antonio Museum of Art, gift of Louis James

Juan Correa was one of the most important painters of the Mexican Baroque period. The son of a prominent mulatto doctor from Cadiz and a free black woman from Mexico City, he lived a long, productive, and prosperous life in New Spain. He made more paintings for the Mexico City Cathedral than anyone else, and his work was sent as far away as Guatemala and Rome. This painting of the Archangel Michael shows him dressed in the uniform of a Roman soldier, a militant defender of the faith. Saint Michael is head of the Heavenly Host and an intermediary between heaven and earth.

 
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Lawrence Jennings

I strongly believe that abstract painting can still be a contemporary, viable, and exciting field of visual culture despite its misguided reputation of not being “cutting edge.”  My current projects have included wall paintings, videos and installations of abstract works that are based in the visual language of painting. Although I consider my work as painting, I have used shaped acrylic sheet, laminate, and skateboards as materials in my work. The fluidity of fractal geometry and abstraction have been ongoing threads in my work as seen in my use of video-feedback patterns, frozen in time, and enlarged into a wall-painting. These experiments with time and space are used to try to make the work less predictable and mannered.

Some details that may not be evident in the image samples are material textures and reflective properties. The grip-tape material found on the top of skateboards is made of black sparkling grit that is abrasive to the touch. When seen in the context of highly polished plastic or painted surfaces, it stops the viewer’s eye movement like a visual grip.

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"Black on Black" by Lawrence Jennings, Acrylic paint on grip-tape panel
"Laminae" by Lawrence Jennings, Grip-tape on Formica, MDF panel
"Would you like to come inside?" by Lawrence Jennings, Acrylic, grip-tape on acrylic sheet

Robert Hughes Gallery
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Albert Kogel

Every painting is a starting over, a tacit recognition that after thirty years of painting I still don't really know how to make a painting happen (which is different from knowing how to paint). I just know I can. I know that if I give myself to the painting, the magic usually comes and at that point it's as if I'm no longer in charge. The path is different with each painting no matter how familiar I am with the process involved or how much a new painting has in common with previous paintings. Each new painting presents its own surprise as it develops and I find these events very compelling and very much like life.

Albert Kogel received his BFA and MFA, University of Arizona in Tucson and attended Freie Kunstschule, Munzigen, in Germany. Today, he is an art professor at Cochise College. His work is hangs in the permanent collections of the Museum of Art in Tucson; Streich Lang, Tucson; Union Gallery, University of Arizona, Tucson; University of Arizona Residence Halls, Tucson; and Museum of Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX. His works has been included in numerous exhibitions over the years.

Bird and Head, painted wood assemblage, 29"x36" 
 

Vanity, painted wood assemblage
 

Bill Gingles

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Every painting is a starting over, a tacit recognition that after thirty years of painting I still don't really know how to make a painting happen (which is different from knowing how to paint). I just know I can. I know that if I give myself to the painting, the magic usually comes and at that point it's as if I'm no longer in charge. The path is different with each painting no matter how familiar I am with the process involved or how much a new painting has in common with previous paintings. Each new painting presents its own surprise as it develops and I find these events very compelling and very much like life.

Bill Gingles received his B. A. in Fine Art in 1979 from Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, Louisiana. He has had a number of solo exhibitions and his work has been included in group shows across the country His work was featured in New American Paintings, Number 22, June/July 1999. Gingles received the  2004-2005 Shreveport Regional Arts Council Fellowship Grant. Today his work hangs in private collections across the country.

The Golden Game, acrylic on canvas, 16"x12"
Backyard Isis, acrylic on canvas, 16"x12"
Reverie, acrylic on canvas, 46"x60"
 
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